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Parental Alienation: Identifying, Addressing, And Combating This Family Law Challenge

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It’s actually extremely common for children to take one parent’s side in a divorce, especially if the kids are old enough to fully understand what’s going on. But it’s something else entirely when a child starts refusing to see the other parent, or the other parent doesn’t follow court-ordered visitation or joint-custody plans.

At Buckhead Family Law, we understand that both of these can be signs of parental alienation, which can be tricky to deal with during Georgia divorce proceedings. In order to properly address the issue in custody litigation, both parties and their lawyers may end up back in court.

What Is Parental Alienation?

Essentially, parental alienation occurs when one parent tries to keep the other away from the children for a myriad of unsubstantiated reasons. For example, it can look like:

  • One parent speaking so badly about the other that the children refuse to speak to them.
  • Keeping children from talking on the phone with the other parent by hiding or restricting access to the child’s phone.
  • Purposely scheduling important things like doctor’s appointments or weekend getaways during the other parent’s time so that they can’t see the kids.
  • Convincing the kids that the other parent hurt them in some way, even though no abuse has occurred.
  • Talking about the divorce in stark details with the kids, providing them with information that they don’t need to know.
  • Not providing the other parent with physical access to the kids, even when it’s their court-mandated time with them.

As you can see, there are plenty of types of parental alienation, and all of these can have a negative impact on the child and the child’s relationship with the other parent. In addition, parental alienation can also be considered child abuse in certain situations.

What Can Be Done About Parental Alienation?

Sometimes, parental alienation needs to be taken care of in the courtroom, with changes made to custody agreements that ensure the children get to see both parents. However, there are some additional ways to deal with the issue that may help everyone involved.

One way to get started is to speak with your divorce lawyer in Georgia. They’ll provide you with plenty of advice, including the fact that you need to still reach out to your children. You may not be able to contact or see them, but there should be records that you’ve tried to do so.

Another option is counseling. Getting the entire family into counseling, a combination of individual and family counseling, can help mend the relationships to a point where everyone is putting the children’s needs first.

Photo by Colin Maynard on Unsplash

Good Record-Keeping is a Must

Even if you think that you can reach a good and fair agreement with the other parent without having to resort to heading to court, it’s important to keep records of everything. Note every time that you try to call your children without success, as well as every day that you’re supposed to see them, but don’t, because of the other parent. Keep a record of all of the phone calls, text messages, emails, and voice mails between you and your former (or soon-to-be former) spouse. If the parental alienation case ends up in front of a judge, these records will show that you’ve tried to see and speak to your kids as much as possible.

Need a Top-Rated Divorce Lawyer in Georgia to Help with Parental Alienation Claims?

Worried that your former spouse is turning your children against you or preventing you from seeing them? Need to prove that the other parent is purposely scheduling events and appointments during your time with the kids to keep you from them?  Are you afraid that your case is going to end up in court alongside other Georgia divorce proceedings? If so, then you need a good family law attorney who is well versed in parental alienation matters.

At Buckhead Family Law, our legal team works diligently to meet the needs of clients getting divorced in today’s tech driven world – this means taking everything online into consideration. One thing that hasn’t changed about divorce? It is still one of the most harrowing experiences someone can go through, and we understand that. That is why we always treat our clients with grace and compassion.

Need help? We are here to assist you as you begin the next chapter of your life while ensuring that all of the loose ends are tied up in the least complicated way. Schedule a consultation today by calling at 404-600-1403.

As you can see, there are plenty of types of parental alienation, and all of these can have a negative impact on the child and the child’s relationship with the other parent. In addition, parental alienation can also be considered child abuse in certain situations.

What Can Be Done About Parental Alienation?

Sometimes, parental alienation needs to be taken care of in the courtroom, with changes made to custody agreements that ensure the children get to see both parents. However, there are some additional ways to deal with the issue that may help everyone involved.

One way to get started is to speak with your divorce lawyer in Georgia. They’ll provide you with plenty of advice, including the fact that you need to still reach out to your children. You may not be able to contact or see them, but there should be records that you’ve tried to do so.

Another option is counseling. Getting the entire family into counseling, a combination of individual and family counseling, can help mend the relationships to a point where everyone is putting the children’s needs first.

Photo by Colin Maynard on Unsplash

Good Record-Keeping is a Must

Even if you think that you can reach a good and fair agreement with the other parent without having to resort to heading to court, it’s important to keep records of everything. Note every time that you try to call your children without success, as well as every day that you’re supposed to see them, but don’t, because of the other parent. Keep a record of all of the phone calls, text messages, emails, and voice mails between you and your former (or soon-to-be former) spouse. If the parental alienation case ends up in front of a judge, these records will show that you’ve tried to see and speak to your kids as much as possible.

Need a Top-Rated Divorce Lawyer in Georgia to Help with Parental Alienation Claims?

Worried that your former spouse is turning your children against you or preventing you from seeing them? Need to prove that the other parent is purposely scheduling events and appointments during your time with the kids to keep you from them?  Are you afraid that your case is going to end up in court alongside other Georgia divorce proceedings? If so, then you need a good family law attorney who is well versed in parental alienation matters.

At Buckhead Family Law, our legal team works diligently to meet the needs of clients getting divorced in today’s tech driven world – this means taking everything online into consideration. One thing that hasn’t changed about divorce? It is still one of the most harrowing experiences someone can go through, and we understand that. That is why we always treat our clients with grace and compassion.

Need help? We are here to assist you as you begin the next chapter of your life while ensuring that all of the loose ends are tied up in the least complicated way. Schedule a consultation today by calling at 404-600-1403.

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